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The ideal sunscreen for your holidays

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The ideal sunscreen for your holidays

The time has come back to decide on the perfect sunblock for this summer. no matter your destination, it’s a vital issue to require into consideration since radiation varies reckoning on the country, the latitude and whether or not we tend to area unit about to surfaces that mirror actinic radiation rays, like ocean water. Also don’t forget that, albeit you’re attending to pay your holidays within the town , your skin are equally exposed to the sun’s rays.

Therefore, where within the world you’re attending to get pleasure from your holidays, you need to defend your skin properly to stay it hydrous, healthy and forestall photoaging : keep in mind that eightieth of our skin aging is caused by the sun . You already apprehend, the sole filter you wish is your sunblock .

If your summer set up is to go to an enormous town (or wander off within the streets of your hometown), it’s probably that you simply can pay more hours than usual walking its streets and exploring all its corners.

ISDIN FotoUltra Age Repair are your excellent companion as a result of it’s the primary facial photoprotector for daily use with triple Associate in Nursingti-photoaging action with an ultra-light, slick texture and quick absorption that conjointly protects the skin from urban pollution and combats the aerophilic harm caused.

you’ll use it safely as a result of it will not leave any residue or shine, and it will not leave your eyes irritated either. Psst, if your set up includes taking non-stop photos, discover our latest release: FotoUltra Age Repair Color. identical triple anti-photoaging action, with barely of color. Hello, sensible face effect! The FotoUltra Age Repair formula, additionally to providing you with high SPF50 protection, is made in antiaging and inhibitor active ingredients (contains desoxyribonucleic acid Repairsomes®, lipopeptide Q10, scleroprotein Booster amide and hyaluronic acid), that improves the looks, snap and brightness of the skin, stimulates the assembly of scleroprotein , reduces wrinkles, moisturizes exhaustive and helps to repair sun harm at the cellular level. after you apply it, {you can|you’ll|you may} notice a nice sensation of freshness that your skin will appreciate! FotoUltra Age Repair and Age Repair Color area unit appropriate for all skin sorts, as well as the foremost sensitive.

they need been clinically tested in real conditions of high radiation and environmental pollution. you’ll love exploitation them as a base for your makeup! Have you planned a vacation of absolute relaxation on beaches with turquoise and crystal clear waters? you’ll most likely pay the day soaking within the sun. you’ll want a product with a high sun protection issue that conjointly hydrates, detoxifies and revitalizes your skin. we tend to suggest HydroLotion SPF fifty.

HydroLotion could be a biphasic body sunblock that, additionally to giving you high UVB/UVA protection, prevents skin chemical reaction due to its formula with algae Maris. simply what you wish to revitalize skin from harm elicited by star radiation! In addition, this sunblock is right for decent days at the beach as its moisturizing formula is water-resistant . you’ll adore it as a result of it’s terribly quickly absorbed, appropriate for the foremost sensitive skin and ocean Friendly : its composition minimizes the impact on the marine setting.

Shake it for five seconds to combine the 2 phases of the merchandise well Associate in Nursingd apply it [*fr1] an hour before sun exposure. Psst, keep in mind to reapply each two hours or once bathing, sweating, or towel drying.

If you’re one in every of those that dreams of escaping from the town and venturing into the mountains, finding a sunblock with high protection are key to keeping your skin healthy and guarded. confine mind that as altitude will increase, the intensity of actinic radiation rays tends to be abundant bigger, therefore it’s even a lot of necessary that you simply defend your skin properly.

Fusion Water is intended to safeguard your face from the sun in these conditions. With high SPF50 UVB and UVA protection, it’s ideal for daily use in your out of doors activities. you’ll love its ultra-light texture, that doesn’t irritate the eyes. Thus, you’ll apply your favorite sports outdoors without concern regarding your skin. Are you attending to the mountains, except for a walk? Fusion Water is additionally for you, as a result of you’ll use it on a daily basis, even underneath your makeup. due to its binary compound section and its light-weight and sleek texture, it’s quickly absorbed while not going a greasy residue, whereas providing you with uniform protection. If you attend the mountains, do not forget to safeguard your body! And if it’s with Associate in Nursing ultralight, invisible, and refreshing protection, even better! Fusion Gel Sport , with SPF fifty, is immune to sweat and really immune to water, therefore you’ll use it even whereas taking part in sports on the most well liked days.

Its new style with snap ring permits you to hold it on your backpack, therefore you’ll perpetually carry it with you! Is your ideal summer decide to go online the wildest waves? For such extreme activities and sports, during which you’ll perpetually be within the water and underneath a hot sun , it’s necessary that you simply keep in mind to perpetually repeat the appliance of your photoprotector: each 2 hours at the foremost and once sweating, swimming or drying yourself with a towel. Finding a sunblock that cares for your skin, is snug to wear, and stays place (especially for water sports) are key. Andy Criere , skilled bather, has it clear

.


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Beauty

Introducing Content mode for easier collaboration

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Introducing Content mode for easier collaboration

Introducing Content mode

With the new “Content mode” available today, teams can collaborate easier than ever.

An insight about content update from our users

It has been a pleasure learning about the challenges faced by today’s teams through our user community.

The importance of keeping website content current is growing. The process usually begins with Designers and Freelancers creating the perfect design, based on today’s content needs. As time passes, content needs evolve, and Marketing and Client teams want to keep the site updated.

In spite of this, updating is not an easy task. If teams are using CMSes like WordPress, Marketing and Client teams have to go to a backend which looks nothing like the actual site. If teams are using website builders, the myriad of controls are nothing but confusing, despite often all one wants to change is just the text or image.

Updating the update process

When teams build their sites on STUDIO, there is now a new mode available in Design Editor – “Content mode.”

With Content mode, Designers and Freelancers can ensure layouts, animations and other configurations are kept intact, while Marketers and Clients can edit text and images at any time, directly on the page. No abstract backend, and no stress of breaking the layout.

How to get started

Get started in your team with 3 simple steps.

(1) Add Marketing or Client teams to your project

(2) Invite them to toggle on “Content mode,” in the bottom left of the page. Or press “C” as a keyboard shortcut.

(3) Enjoy the flexibility of editing text, images and icons directly on the page, with the layout kept intact

And here you go! If you have any questions, tweet us @studio or give us a shoutout on Discord. Happy creating!

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Beauty

Has your Ryanair flight been cancelled? A guide to your rights

There are many ways to get to Montenegro Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

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There are many ways to get to Montenegro’s Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

‘Let me take you to the airport,’ he sounded genuinely concerned. ‘You will be in the sea and in the sun and with a beer in half an hour. This thing you are doing, it will take all day … and into the night.’ He finally relented as we pulled up to the curb: ‘At least buy water, sandwiches, and toilet paper.’

The cabbie left me in front of the crenellated railway station, a faded Habsburg-yellow throwback opened in 1884. He was already speeding off to advise another tourist before I could throw my bag over my shoulder. Inside, I found the ticket office. The woman behind the glass informed me that the trip from Belgrade, Serbia, to Bar, Montenegro – on the Adriatic edge of the Balkan Peninsula – takes 12 hours. It costs 21 euros (there would be an additional three-euro charge for a seat reservation). ‘Yes, there is a bakery nearby,’ she said and pointed. ‘It is behind you. The shop for water and tissues is next to it.’ She slid the window closed, stood, picked up her pack of cigarettes, and disappeared.

[bs-quote quote=”You have to be the best of whatever you are, but successful, cool actresses come in all shapes and sizes.” style=”style-8″ align=”right” author_name=”Jessica Alba” author_job=”American Actress” author_avatar=”https://liqastudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/brilliance-quote-avatar.jpg”]

That sense of old-world drama would serve me well, I would soon learn, along this route. On the outskirts of the Serbian capital – as I settled into my seat in a weathered, six-person cabin – we passed Topčider Station, where the hulking locomotives from Yugoslav leader Marshal Tito’s famous Blue Train are stored. The behemoths sat dishevelled, graffitied, but still regal and almost lifelike, wishing me a safe passage to the outer lands. Within an hour, the tangle of urban metal and concrete unravelled, and the countryside spread out in all directions with the urgency of a jailbreak. The sun came out as wet, emerald-green hummocks began to play leapfrog across the vista, rolling until they dove out of sight over the horizon.

Though the Belgrade–Bar line doesn’t have a sexy moniker (like the Royal Scotsman or Rocky Mountaineer), the Yugoslav Flyer would be appropriate. When construction began on the 476km railway in 1951, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was in its infancy: a tenuous post-WWII cadre of states on the Balkan Peninsula’s western half. By the time the route opened in 1976 – complete with 254 tunnels and 234 bridges winding down from the Pannonian Plain to the island-studded Adriatic Sea – the country had implanted itself as a geopolitical force and a synapse between the West and the Soviet Union.

Yugoslavia has since splintered into seven nations. The railway, thankfully, endures, connecting Serbia to Montenegro with a brief blip across Bosnia & Hercegovina’s eastern border. But the line’s existence represents more than just a continued, now international, transport option. These tracks are the Balkans – and a lifeline to a swath of land where cultures have intertwined since before history. Here, the train takes adventurers across vistas crisscrossed by Greeks and Illyrians, as well as the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires. Along the way, visitors have a literal window onto a living museum frozen in time.

Those natural exhibits were on full display as we rumbled through the foothills of the Dinaric Alps in the southwestern corner of Serbia. When we crossed the border into Montenegro, the museum’s lineup of canvases – pristine panoramas and landscapes – changed again. The Western Balkans’ rotating collection now included towering mountains and canyons that engulfed us whole.

‘I had no idea what to expect,’ said Colin Smith, a fellow passenger and UK native. Outside the window, an old couple leaned against pitchforks next to haystacks. Behind them, vegetable gardens and a small-but-dense orchard of plum trees surrounded a stone farmhouse. ‘But I am so surprised by the beauty: the mountains, steep ravines and endless drops.’

Before I went to sleep that night, I remembered my taxi driver: ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ Lying in bed, I could hear the sea washing onto the shore outside my rented apartment’s window. If I ever saw him again, I would make sure to tell the cabbie he was right: a flight would have been much faster and easier, and more sterile.

Book tickets (and separate necessary reservations) at the station a day in advance. There are 1st- and 2nd-class options. Night-train passengers can choose between couchettes or sleepers (with two or three beds). A one-way ticket (from Belgrade) costs 21 euros; a reservation is necessary and costs an additional three euros. Second-class couchettes on night trains cost an additional six euros. A bed in a three-bed sleeper is 15 euros; a bed in a two-bed sleeper is 20 euros.

The Belgrade–Bar railway line runs twice per day, in both directions. From Belgrade, the train departs at 9:10am and at 9:10pm; the trip takes 12 hour.

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Beauty

Anchovies Make Everything Taste Better

There are many ways to get to Montenegro Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

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There are many ways to get to Montenegro’s Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

‘Let me take you to the airport,’ he sounded genuinely concerned. ‘You will be in the sea and in the sun and with a beer in half an hour. This thing you are doing, it will take all day … and into the night.’ He finally relented as we pulled up to the curb: ‘At least buy water, sandwiches, and toilet paper.’

The cabbie left me in front of the crenellated railway station, a faded Habsburg-yellow throwback opened in 1884. He was already speeding off to advise another tourist before I could throw my bag over my shoulder. Inside, I found the ticket office. The woman behind the glass informed me that the trip from Belgrade, Serbia, to Bar, Montenegro – on the Adriatic edge of the Balkan Peninsula – takes 12 hours. It costs 21 euros (there would be an additional three-euro charge for a seat reservation). ‘Yes, there is a bakery nearby,’ she said and pointed. ‘It is behind you. The shop for water and tissues is next to it.’ She slid the window closed, stood, picked up her pack of cigarettes, and disappeared.

[bs-quote quote=”You have to be the best of whatever you are, but successful, cool actresses come in all shapes and sizes.” style=”style-8″ align=”right” author_name=”Jessica Alba” author_job=”American Actress” author_avatar=”https://liqastudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/brilliance-quote-avatar.jpg”]

That sense of old-world drama would serve me well, I would soon learn, along this route. On the outskirts of the Serbian capital – as I settled into my seat in a weathered, six-person cabin – we passed Topčider Station, where the hulking locomotives from Yugoslav leader Marshal Tito’s famous Blue Train are stored. The behemoths sat dishevelled, graffitied, but still regal and almost lifelike, wishing me a safe passage to the outer lands. Within an hour, the tangle of urban metal and concrete unravelled, and the countryside spread out in all directions with the urgency of a jailbreak. The sun came out as wet, emerald-green hummocks began to play leapfrog across the vista, rolling until they dove out of sight over the horizon.

Though the Belgrade–Bar line doesn’t have a sexy moniker (like the Royal Scotsman or Rocky Mountaineer), the Yugoslav Flyer would be appropriate. When construction began on the 476km railway in 1951, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was in its infancy: a tenuous post-WWII cadre of states on the Balkan Peninsula’s western half. By the time the route opened in 1976 – complete with 254 tunnels and 234 bridges winding down from the Pannonian Plain to the island-studded Adriatic Sea – the country had implanted itself as a geopolitical force and a synapse between the West and the Soviet Union.

Yugoslavia has since splintered into seven nations. The railway, thankfully, endures, connecting Serbia to Montenegro with a brief blip across Bosnia & Hercegovina’s eastern border. But the line’s existence represents more than just a continued, now international, transport option. These tracks are the Balkans – and a lifeline to a swath of land where cultures have intertwined since before history. Here, the train takes adventurers across vistas crisscrossed by Greeks and Illyrians, as well as the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires. Along the way, visitors have a literal window onto a living museum frozen in time.

Those natural exhibits were on full display as we rumbled through the foothills of the Dinaric Alps in the southwestern corner of Serbia. When we crossed the border into Montenegro, the museum’s lineup of canvases – pristine panoramas and landscapes – changed again. The Western Balkans’ rotating collection now included towering mountains and canyons that engulfed us whole.

‘I had no idea what to expect,’ said Colin Smith, a fellow passenger and UK native. Outside the window, an old couple leaned against pitchforks next to haystacks. Behind them, vegetable gardens and a small-but-dense orchard of plum trees surrounded a stone farmhouse. ‘But I am so surprised by the beauty: the mountains, steep ravines and endless drops.’

Before I went to sleep that night, I remembered my taxi driver: ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ Lying in bed, I could hear the sea washing onto the shore outside my rented apartment’s window. If I ever saw him again, I would make sure to tell the cabbie he was right: a flight would have been much faster and easier, and more sterile.

Book tickets (and separate necessary reservations) at the station a day in advance. There are 1st- and 2nd-class options. Night-train passengers can choose between couchettes or sleepers (with two or three beds). A one-way ticket (from Belgrade) costs 21 euros; a reservation is necessary and costs an additional three euros. Second-class couchettes on night trains cost an additional six euros. A bed in a three-bed sleeper is 15 euros; a bed in a two-bed sleeper is 20 euros.

The Belgrade–Bar railway line runs twice per day, in both directions. From Belgrade, the train departs at 9:10am and at 9:10pm; the trip takes 12 hour.

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