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Has your Ryanair flight been cancelled? A guide to your rights

There are many ways to get to Montenegro Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

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There are many ways to get to Montenegro’s Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

‘Let me take you to the airport,’ he sounded genuinely concerned. ‘You will be in the sea and in the sun and with a beer in half an hour. This thing you are doing, it will take all day … and into the night.’ He finally relented as we pulled up to the curb: ‘At least buy water, sandwiches, and toilet paper.’

The cabbie left me in front of the crenellated railway station, a faded Habsburg-yellow throwback opened in 1884. He was already speeding off to advise another tourist before I could throw my bag over my shoulder. Inside, I found the ticket office. The woman behind the glass informed me that the trip from Belgrade, Serbia, to Bar, Montenegro – on the Adriatic edge of the Balkan Peninsula – takes 12 hours. It costs 21 euros (there would be an additional three-euro charge for a seat reservation). ‘Yes, there is a bakery nearby,’ she said and pointed. ‘It is behind you. The shop for water and tissues is next to it.’ She slid the window closed, stood, picked up her pack of cigarettes, and disappeared.

[bs-quote quote=”You have to be the best of whatever you are, but successful, cool actresses come in all shapes and sizes.” style=”style-8″ align=”right” author_name=”Jessica Alba” author_job=”American Actress” author_avatar=”https://liqastudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/brilliance-quote-avatar.jpg”]

That sense of old-world drama would serve me well, I would soon learn, along this route. On the outskirts of the Serbian capital – as I settled into my seat in a weathered, six-person cabin – we passed Topčider Station, where the hulking locomotives from Yugoslav leader Marshal Tito’s famous Blue Train are stored. The behemoths sat dishevelled, graffitied, but still regal and almost lifelike, wishing me a safe passage to the outer lands. Within an hour, the tangle of urban metal and concrete unravelled, and the countryside spread out in all directions with the urgency of a jailbreak. The sun came out as wet, emerald-green hummocks began to play leapfrog across the vista, rolling until they dove out of sight over the horizon.

Though the Belgrade–Bar line doesn’t have a sexy moniker (like the Royal Scotsman or Rocky Mountaineer), the Yugoslav Flyer would be appropriate. When construction began on the 476km railway in 1951, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was in its infancy: a tenuous post-WWII cadre of states on the Balkan Peninsula’s western half. By the time the route opened in 1976 – complete with 254 tunnels and 234 bridges winding down from the Pannonian Plain to the island-studded Adriatic Sea – the country had implanted itself as a geopolitical force and a synapse between the West and the Soviet Union.

Yugoslavia has since splintered into seven nations. The railway, thankfully, endures, connecting Serbia to Montenegro with a brief blip across Bosnia & Hercegovina’s eastern border. But the line’s existence represents more than just a continued, now international, transport option. These tracks are the Balkans – and a lifeline to a swath of land where cultures have intertwined since before history. Here, the train takes adventurers across vistas crisscrossed by Greeks and Illyrians, as well as the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires. Along the way, visitors have a literal window onto a living museum frozen in time.

Those natural exhibits were on full display as we rumbled through the foothills of the Dinaric Alps in the southwestern corner of Serbia. When we crossed the border into Montenegro, the museum’s lineup of canvases – pristine panoramas and landscapes – changed again. The Western Balkans’ rotating collection now included towering mountains and canyons that engulfed us whole.

‘I had no idea what to expect,’ said Colin Smith, a fellow passenger and UK native. Outside the window, an old couple leaned against pitchforks next to haystacks. Behind them, vegetable gardens and a small-but-dense orchard of plum trees surrounded a stone farmhouse. ‘But I am so surprised by the beauty: the mountains, steep ravines and endless drops.’

Before I went to sleep that night, I remembered my taxi driver: ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ Lying in bed, I could hear the sea washing onto the shore outside my rented apartment’s window. If I ever saw him again, I would make sure to tell the cabbie he was right: a flight would have been much faster and easier, and more sterile.

Book tickets (and separate necessary reservations) at the station a day in advance. There are 1st- and 2nd-class options. Night-train passengers can choose between couchettes or sleepers (with two or three beds). A one-way ticket (from Belgrade) costs 21 euros; a reservation is necessary and costs an additional three euros. Second-class couchettes on night trains cost an additional six euros. A bed in a three-bed sleeper is 15 euros; a bed in a two-bed sleeper is 20 euros.

The Belgrade–Bar railway line runs twice per day, in both directions. From Belgrade, the train departs at 9:10am and at 9:10pm; the trip takes 12 hour.

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Beauty

Introducing Content mode for easier collaboration

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Introducing Content mode for easier collaboration

Introducing Content mode

With the new “Content mode” available today, teams can collaborate easier than ever.

An insight about content update from our users

It has been a pleasure learning about the challenges faced by today’s teams through our user community.

The importance of keeping website content current is growing. The process usually begins with Designers and Freelancers creating the perfect design, based on today’s content needs. As time passes, content needs evolve, and Marketing and Client teams want to keep the site updated.

In spite of this, updating is not an easy task. If teams are using CMSes like WordPress, Marketing and Client teams have to go to a backend which looks nothing like the actual site. If teams are using website builders, the myriad of controls are nothing but confusing, despite often all one wants to change is just the text or image.

Updating the update process

When teams build their sites on STUDIO, there is now a new mode available in Design Editor – “Content mode.”

With Content mode, Designers and Freelancers can ensure layouts, animations and other configurations are kept intact, while Marketers and Clients can edit text and images at any time, directly on the page. No abstract backend, and no stress of breaking the layout.

How to get started

Get started in your team with 3 simple steps.

(1) Add Marketing or Client teams to your project

(2) Invite them to toggle on “Content mode,” in the bottom left of the page. Or press “C” as a keyboard shortcut.

(3) Enjoy the flexibility of editing text, images and icons directly on the page, with the layout kept intact

And here you go! If you have any questions, tweet us @studio or give us a shoutout on Discord. Happy creating!

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Beauty

Anchovies Make Everything Taste Better

There are many ways to get to Montenegro Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

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There are many ways to get to Montenegro’s Adriatic Coast, my taxi driver assured me, raising his voice over a chorus of horns that angrily saluted his laissez-faire attitude toward lane use during morning rush-hour traffic in Belgrade. ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ He weaved through less aggressive vehicles like a skier clearing slalom gates. A cold, grey autumn rain began to fall harder, drops beading down my window, as the main railway station came into view.

‘Let me take you to the airport,’ he sounded genuinely concerned. ‘You will be in the sea and in the sun and with a beer in half an hour. This thing you are doing, it will take all day … and into the night.’ He finally relented as we pulled up to the curb: ‘At least buy water, sandwiches, and toilet paper.’

The cabbie left me in front of the crenellated railway station, a faded Habsburg-yellow throwback opened in 1884. He was already speeding off to advise another tourist before I could throw my bag over my shoulder. Inside, I found the ticket office. The woman behind the glass informed me that the trip from Belgrade, Serbia, to Bar, Montenegro – on the Adriatic edge of the Balkan Peninsula – takes 12 hours. It costs 21 euros (there would be an additional three-euro charge for a seat reservation). ‘Yes, there is a bakery nearby,’ she said and pointed. ‘It is behind you. The shop for water and tissues is next to it.’ She slid the window closed, stood, picked up her pack of cigarettes, and disappeared.

[bs-quote quote=”You have to be the best of whatever you are, but successful, cool actresses come in all shapes and sizes.” style=”style-8″ align=”right” author_name=”Jessica Alba” author_job=”American Actress” author_avatar=”https://liqastudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/brilliance-quote-avatar.jpg”]

That sense of old-world drama would serve me well, I would soon learn, along this route. On the outskirts of the Serbian capital – as I settled into my seat in a weathered, six-person cabin – we passed Topčider Station, where the hulking locomotives from Yugoslav leader Marshal Tito’s famous Blue Train are stored. The behemoths sat dishevelled, graffitied, but still regal and almost lifelike, wishing me a safe passage to the outer lands. Within an hour, the tangle of urban metal and concrete unravelled, and the countryside spread out in all directions with the urgency of a jailbreak. The sun came out as wet, emerald-green hummocks began to play leapfrog across the vista, rolling until they dove out of sight over the horizon.

Though the Belgrade–Bar line doesn’t have a sexy moniker (like the Royal Scotsman or Rocky Mountaineer), the Yugoslav Flyer would be appropriate. When construction began on the 476km railway in 1951, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was in its infancy: a tenuous post-WWII cadre of states on the Balkan Peninsula’s western half. By the time the route opened in 1976 – complete with 254 tunnels and 234 bridges winding down from the Pannonian Plain to the island-studded Adriatic Sea – the country had implanted itself as a geopolitical force and a synapse between the West and the Soviet Union.

Yugoslavia has since splintered into seven nations. The railway, thankfully, endures, connecting Serbia to Montenegro with a brief blip across Bosnia & Hercegovina’s eastern border. But the line’s existence represents more than just a continued, now international, transport option. These tracks are the Balkans – and a lifeline to a swath of land where cultures have intertwined since before history. Here, the train takes adventurers across vistas crisscrossed by Greeks and Illyrians, as well as the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires. Along the way, visitors have a literal window onto a living museum frozen in time.

Those natural exhibits were on full display as we rumbled through the foothills of the Dinaric Alps in the southwestern corner of Serbia. When we crossed the border into Montenegro, the museum’s lineup of canvases – pristine panoramas and landscapes – changed again. The Western Balkans’ rotating collection now included towering mountains and canyons that engulfed us whole.

‘I had no idea what to expect,’ said Colin Smith, a fellow passenger and UK native. Outside the window, an old couple leaned against pitchforks next to haystacks. Behind them, vegetable gardens and a small-but-dense orchard of plum trees surrounded a stone farmhouse. ‘But I am so surprised by the beauty: the mountains, steep ravines and endless drops.’

Before I went to sleep that night, I remembered my taxi driver: ‘But it makes no sense to take the train.’ Lying in bed, I could hear the sea washing onto the shore outside my rented apartment’s window. If I ever saw him again, I would make sure to tell the cabbie he was right: a flight would have been much faster and easier, and more sterile.

Book tickets (and separate necessary reservations) at the station a day in advance. There are 1st- and 2nd-class options. Night-train passengers can choose between couchettes or sleepers (with two or three beds). A one-way ticket (from Belgrade) costs 21 euros; a reservation is necessary and costs an additional three euros. Second-class couchettes on night trains cost an additional six euros. A bed in a three-bed sleeper is 15 euros; a bed in a two-bed sleeper is 20 euros.

The Belgrade–Bar railway line runs twice per day, in both directions. From Belgrade, the train departs at 9:10am and at 9:10pm; the trip takes 12 hour.

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Beauty

Is This Onion Water Hack the Secret to Healthy Hair?

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Is This Onion Water Hack the Secret to Healthy Hair?

Cardi B recently set social media ablaze when she took to Instagram to share a potentially unexpected secret to healthy hair: onion water.

The rapper says that the DIY, at-home treatment has left her hair shinier after just two washes — and the supposed before-and-after pictures she posted to Instagram are undeniably convincing.

She may be the first female rapper to have three diamond single certifications from the Recording Industry Association of America, per Paper Magazine, but she’s certainly not the first to use the at-home hair treatment. Countless followers who flocked to Cardi B’s comments section praised the performer for utilizing the natural remedy, as it’s deeply embedded in ayurvedic practices and Dominican culture (though it’s unclear where the practice originated). And William Gaunitz, a certified trichologist, or hair and scalp expert, and founder of Advanced Trichology in Phoenix, Arizona, says that his hair loss patients have been discussing this natural treatment for years.

Gaunitz says claims about onion water’s benefits for the hair “hold validity to a degree.” But he doesn’t unconditionally support the practice because “it’s subject to a random recipe” with a “variety of variables” that may or may not work.

While Cardi B’s hack involved boiling onions and using the water, Gaunitz notes that he’s encountered patients who’ve blended onions to make a juice-like substance that they use as a scalp treatment before rinsing it off in the shower.

Still others chop the vegetable and add it to their shampoo. That’s the case for PureWow writer Angie Martinez-Tejada, who learned about the supposed trick from her Dominican mother. She used the onion shampoo first and followed up with a second shampoo, which she says masks any lingering onion scent.

But what does the science say about this hair-raising hack? Ahead, we break down everything you need to know before you douse your hair in onion water.

What Are the Health Benefits of Onion Water for Hair?

Onions’ health properties mean the vegetable may offer a bevy of benefits for the hair. “Rich in antioxidants and flavonoids, onions offer antimicrobial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory benefits,” says Kerry Yates, a trichologist and founder of Colour Collective based in Dallas. These properties make it a potential solution to alleviate fungal infections that can cause dandruff, she adds. While there’s a lack of high-quality research on how these properties translate to your scalp, one review published in 2020 in the Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences noted the antifungal and antimicrobial potential of onion extract and onion essential oils.

And while research on the real-world applications of onions for hair is limited, one past study suggested that onion water could help promote hair re-growth among study participants living with alopecia areata, which is a condition that causes hair loss.

The study involved 38 women and men who applied onion juice or tap water to their scalp twice daily for two months. Of the 23 participants who used onion juice, 20 people (or 87 percent) noticed regrowth by six weeks into the trial, while only two people from the tap water group noticed the same. But the small sample size of this study means that further research is needed to fully understand this potential effect.

One possible reason onion juice may be a boon to your hair? “The sulfur content of onion water is very high,” says Gaunitz. You’ll also find high levels of sulfur in other foods, including meat, eggs, cruciferous veggies, and other alliaceous veggies like garlic, per past research. This nutrient leaves you teary after chopping onions, noted The New York Times. But it can have other effects, Gaunitz continues: “Since sulfur is a common OTC treatment for inflammatory skin conditions when applied to the scalp, it works for many people who have inflammatory hair loss issues.”

Take note, though: Onion water won’t work for all types of hair loss, such as hair loss caused by nutrient deficiencies and androgenetic alopecia, says Gaunitz. There’s no research to suggest that onion juice could suppress dihydrotestosterone levels to prevent androgenetic alopecia. Likewise, it hasn’t been shown to boost protein or vitamin D levels at the base of the hair follicle, which could assist in nutritional hair loss.

In either of those cases, it’s best to consult with a certified dermatologist or trichologist.

What Are the Potential Side Effects of Onion Water for Hair?

If you are allergic to onions, avoid using them topically entirely, including in onion water, warns Yates.

And even if you’re not allergic, be sure to thoroughly wash the onion water out of your scalp to prevent irritation. (It’s unlikely, but not impossible, that it could irritate your skin, according to the Environmental Working Group.)

While smelling like onions isn’t a health-related side-effect, it’s probably not the fragrance you’re after. The good news: Teamed with shampoo, “the onion smell should come right out” after rinsing, says Gaunitz.

How to Use Onion Water for Healthy Hair 

If you’re interested in giving the onion water hair remedy a try, Gaunitz advises against cooking or boiling them. “The [theoretical] medicinal properties come from the raw onion itself,” he explains.

Instead, here’s one potential method, per the New Jersey Hair Restoration Center:

  1. Peel and chop three to four onions into small pieces.
  2. Extract the juice by squeezing or blending them.
  3. Apply the juice to your scalp using a cotton pad. Optionally, adds Yates, you can add a little lemon juice if you want to offset the smell of the onion.
  4. Massage it into the scalp, let it sit for an hour, and then rinse. Follow with a second cleanse of your usual shampoo.

If you’re wary about concocting a DIY onion water solution, Yates suggests opting for a topical haircare treatment like shampoo, conditioner, or oil containing onion juice.

Hair-Healthy Alternatives to Onion Water

Not all experts advocate for the onion water trend. “While onions can be a powerful antioxidant, I wouldn’t invest too much stock, medically speaking, in the latest social media trend, or one that celebrities swear by,” says William Yates, MD, a Chicago-based hair loss surgeon. “The truth is that much of your hair loss (or lack thereof) is genetically written in stone. Aside from disease, which we saw happen very widespread with COVID, and hormonal imbalances, your hair density is mostly predetermined based on the inherited traits from your parents.”

Instead, he advises that you focus on “getting enough nutrients by eliminating processed foods and opting for a diet rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals.” The Cleveland Clinic offers similar advice to prevent hair loss, noting that protein-rich foods and a Mediterranean diet may be especially beneficial.

As for your hair-care routine: “Remove any harsh chemicals such as phthalates, sulfates, and alcohol,” Dr. Yates advises.

The Takeaway 

Using onion water to improve scalp health and your hair’s appearance is not a new practice — it’s rooted in Ayurvedic practices and Dominican culture. Overall, while some people claim it can reduce dandruff, reduce hair loss, and boost shine, the research evidence to support widespread use of onion treatments for scalp and hair issues is lacking. Although the theoretical risk and cost are low, consult a dermatologist or trichologist before trying the DIY treatment, as not all hair concerns can benefit from this practice.

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